Connect with us

Entertainment

Why a Nigerian mother fought to keep her child in Italy

Published

on

Why a Nigerian mother fought to keep her child in Italy, a Nigerian mother with her two-year-old son hung out with her in the central city of Sicily in a sunly afternoon and watched him play.

Why a Nigerian mother fought to keep her child in Italy

kate and son

They share a yard with a few African families within one ghetto area in Palermo.

It makes her happy to see her son enjoying his play while she watches him.

But the 25-year-old woman’s life was filled with dark memories. Authorities at the shelter for migrant women and children stayed before want to take her children away.

Why a Nigerian mother fought to keep her child in Italy

kate son

It’s unknown what her real name was; people call her Mary, but she lived in Sicily for five years after being trafficked from her home country Niger Delta.

In reality, her assurance that she will be employed claimed that she would get a beta job; however, she was forced to work as a prostitute in Palermo, Italy.

She stated that women who have come to Italy under the immigration system always feared the government not to take their children to foster homes or adoption. Mary says that two of her Nigerian friends who live in the shelter experienced the same thing.

Women who have been victims of trafficking usually end up at shelters such as this.

The Italian way isn’t the way to do things.

The NGOs implement the package on behalf of the Italian government and assist vulnerable mothers in recovering from their traumatic experiences.

Yet, no one knows how many migrant mothers put up their children for adoption or foster care in Italy since the data is not available.

Mary gave birth to her son in Palermo in September 2018 after all the suffering she endured.

She was in love with a kind young Nigerian man that made her happy, and she became pregnant. The story should have ended happily, but instead, she finds herself at a shelter after giving birth.

Why a Nigerian mother fought to keep her child in Italy

There is a prominent Nigerian community living in Palermo.

When Mary reached there, she discovered that the place was difficult, and she feared that they would not pick up her son.

She said staff told her that the way she raised her son did not represent Italian culture.

ALSO READ:  Why Caitlyn Jenner 'Against Transgender' In Girl's Sport

The “African” ways she raised her son were shocking to them, as in she carried him on her back, or she put food in his mouth.

The mother told them that it is normal for mothers in Nigeria to raise their children in this way.

They told her if she didn’t stop, social services would be notified, and she would lose her son.

There was a fight over the child.

At the shelter, Mary says the workers do not provide the support she needs to care for her son.

According to Italian law, in September 2019, the shelter found out I was raising my baby in the wrong way.

However, the staff was still unhappy with how she raised her child, so the issue turned into a serious argument.

They grabbed her baby, and she struggled with them, forcing them to leave her.

“Before you take my baby, make sure you kill me,” she said, begging the authorities not to carry her baby away.

Her baby was crying too; after a while, the staff gives her the baby back.

Then she began planning to leave the shelter, and with the help of a local NGO, she managed to leave the shelter by November 2019.

However, before she can leave, she has to ensure the social services that she and her boyfriend can take care of their son.

The boyfriend got a better job and also got a place to live. He bought a bed for their baby and a wardrobe, and after a few weeks, the Shelter staff approved it and said they could move in together.

The European Court of Human Rights supports a Nigerian mother.

The European Court of Human Rights ruled in April that Italy has violated a Nigerian mother’s rights whose children were collected by authorities for the year 2017 in Rome.

Two different Italian families adopted her two children, and they would not allow her to see them.

The court condemned the Italian authorities for not appreciating that her Nigerian background dictated that she had to learn parenting skills that were different.

And the court ordered Italy to compensate the woman based on the Indecent ruling, saying the Italian authorities did not consider the woman’s condition, calling her a survivor of trafficking.

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Trending

error: